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[Music]
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Hi. Kelly from Opto 22 here. I'm not in the office today, because today I'm in Foothill Ranch,
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California, here at the headquarters of Lumenyte International Corporation. Lumenyte
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has been producing fiber-optic lighting for over 26 years now, and they have a very interesting
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process control application, which they've offered to show us. Let's go check it out.
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>>Kelly: I'm now sitting down with Scott Dill from Lumenyte. Mr. Dill, can you tell us a little bit about yourself?
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>>Scott: Sure. I've been with the company since the start, in production and operations management.
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I'm currently the facilities and production operations manager.
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>>Kelly: Can you kind of explain to us what Lumenyte does? >>Scott: We manufacture fiber-optics and put together
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lighting systems. We manufacture illumination sources. We're moving into LED illumination
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sources. Recently we've had a lot of new business stemming from the Homeland Security and the
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military aspects of things, providing security solutions that are designed to help with
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inspections, primarily for explosives and things of that like. The potential for green
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lighting, or environmentally-sound lighting and energy-conservation lighting in conjunction
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with solar light sources: that's a potential frontier. It's your imagination that's really
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the limitation for the applications and the uses of the fiber-optics and combination of light sources.
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>>Kelly: So, when you guys are making your fiber-optics,
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what's one of the largest challenges that you have to overcome in the process?
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>>Scott: Maintaining very strict consistency and very very tight tolerances and specifications.
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The environmental conditions need to be very tight in order to have a consistent result
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in turning out this product. We bring together different aspects. Um, we have polymerization,
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casting, we have to bring the chemicals together, we have the chemical processes and purifications.
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We have to have a nice tight control process, because it's very difficult to control the
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polymerization of a product over a long length like that.
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>>Kelly: So, I realize Lumenyte's process is proprietary, but do you mind showing us some of
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your control equipment in action? >>Scott: Sure.
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>>Scott: Hi. We're out in the production area now, adjacent to the casting chamber. I wanted
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to introduce Paul Robbins at this time. He's our VP of Operations and he helps oversee
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all of the operations in general. What you are just looking at is the main casting chamber.
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All of the thermal sensors and valves that allow us to control the hot and cold attributes
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of this process reside up and down the length of this chamber. And all of the equipment
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hooks into the equipment pad over here, the tanks and what we call the ARS or air refrigeration
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system. And all of this stuff that's on the chamber and the pad is all wired back into
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the control panel, and this is where the Opto 22 control equipment and hardware resides
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and is controlled from there. All right, we're coming into the control room,
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our little room that we do all of the set-up and start-up and shut-down and monitoring from.
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The computers are in here and HMIs are available for us in here. This is our main
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monitoring page. It shows us most of the attributes and the process, and it enables us to monitor
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almost all of the different aspects of the process and make sure they keep going right,
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the pumps are moving at the right speeds, that the sensors are activating when they
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are supposed to activate, and reading all the proper temperatures. And we can go onto
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a couple of other screens such as this one which helps us monitor in more detail things
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like the cooling system. And back to the reactor we've also got a series of input pages for
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the operators where they start the system, inputting the different information parameters
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for each particular production run. >>Randy: When I first became involved with
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the project was to provide backup to our engineering and production staff in the
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event that we had issues that needed to be dealt with. As the Director of IT for this company,
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I am pretty much involved with anything that has an engineering process or computer
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application or software that's installed to provide services for the project to be completed.
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Our fear was that if we went in and we started making changes without having proper education
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as our background, we would upset our system. This system being the lifeblood of our organization
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we could not afford to do that. So that being the case, we went to the Opto 22 training
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and received a great welcome from the Opto 22 staff, and phenomenal training. The hospitality
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was tremendous, as well as the professionalism of the trainers, the entire staff that we
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dealt with. So the training gave us the necessary skills and the confidence to go forward and
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actually start to execute the changes that we needed to make and move into more state-of-the-art systems.
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>>Scott: Well, Kelly, I think that pretty well summarizes our process and our operations.
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>>Kelly: Well, thank you for having us here and for showing us all this interesting equipment. It's always nice to see
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an industrial automation application in action, so it was great to be able to come here today.
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And thank you guys for watching this video. I hope you found it as interesting as I found it.
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If you would like more information about this application, or other applications, please visit the Opto 22 website.
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Have a great day!