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Hi, my name is Alexi and I’m the Director of Training here at Opto 22.
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In this short video, I’ll introduce you to the popular SNAP PAC System.
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The SNAP PAC System is a complete set of hardware and software from Opto 22 designed to tackle
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your industrial control, remote monitoring, and data acquisition applications.
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The SNAP PAC system consists of four integrated components:
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software, controllers, brains, and I/O. Put these four things together,
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and you can control or monitor just about anything.
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Let's start at the top, with software. PAC Project is our software suite designed
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specifically for our SNAP PAC System hardware. This means you know the software and hardware
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will work together, and you have only one vendor to call if you have a question.
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The centerpiece of PAC Project is PAC Control. It’s an easy-to-use, flowchart-based control
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programming language. We made it even easier by basing the software on a single tagname
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database and using a plain English command set. That way commands are understandable,
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and I/O points and program variables have meaningful names.
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You can develop your application using simple, intuitive flowchart objects like action blocks,
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condition blocks, and connection lines that determine logic flow.
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You can also use OptoScript, a procedural-type language similar to Visual Basic.
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Once tagnames are defined in PAC Control, they are instantly available in PAC Display,
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our HMI software.
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That means you’ll never need to retype tagnames or refer to cross-reference tables.
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PAC Display is loaded with features, including real time and historic trending, data logging,
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security, alarming, and recipes. You can create your own screens using the
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included library of 3000 industrial automation graphics or import your own graphical files.
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Best of all, there are no tag limits or hardware keys.
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PAC Project also has an optional OPC server, and database connectivity software. These
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programs make it easy to share your SNAP PAC System data with other HMI applications like
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Wonderware and Intellution, and with databases such as SQL Server and Microsoft Access.
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Now let’s move on to the second part of the SNAP PAC System: the controllers.
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PACs, or Programmable Automation Controllers, run your control program, communicate with
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your I/O, and provide data to your HMI. We offer two types of SNAP PAC controllers:
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standalone S-series, and rack-mounted R-series PACs.
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Standalone controllers are best for large, distributed systems with many points of remote
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I/O. Rack-mounted controllers are ideal for smaller
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systems with smaller point counts, like cell control. It’s important to understand that
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PACs are much more than a traditional PLC. Like PLCs, they can handle everyday control
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and automation tasks involving digital and analog I/O.
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But PACs go further by including sophisticated PID loop control, serial data and string handling,
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table arrays, full floating point math, and are capable of storing large amounts of data.
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Plus, PACs include built-in Ethernet networking and serial ports for use with modems.
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Because of all this functionality, PACs are ideal for process control, sequential logic,
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barcode and RFID applications, SCADA, motion, and much more.
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The third part of the SNAP PAC System is brains. We call our I/O processors "brains" because
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they provide a lot of distributed local intelligence and control.
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SNAP PAC brains are available with Ethernet networking or RS-485 serial networking.
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There are two Ethernet-based brains, the SNAP-PAC-EB1 and the SNAP-PAC-EB2.
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The EB1 supports high-speed digital functions, while the EB2 does not.
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But both handle analog, digital, and serial I/O. Both support input latching, thermocouple
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linearization, watchdog timeouts, analog clamping and scaling, PID control, and much more.
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All of these functions are performed at the brain level, freeing up your main PAC controller
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for other tasks. That’s what makes the SNAP PAC System unique. The distribution of control
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functions among the PAC controller and the I/O processors, or brains, provides much more
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power, capability, and versatility than any PLC System available today. And when it comes
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to networking your I/O, you’ll love the fact that the Ethernet-based brains have a
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built-in Ethernet switch. That means that you can multidrop I/O units without the need
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for additional Ethernet switches. Or, if you prefer serial networking for your
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remote I/O, use our SB-series brains, which work on an RS-485 multi-drop network.
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One note: if you choose the SNAP PAC R-series controller for your application, it includes
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both a controller and a brain in one compact package. If your system grows, the R-series
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PACs support EB-series brains for additional remote I/O.
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The fourth part of the SNAP PAC System is I/O modules, or input/output modules.
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They connect to your various field devices such as circuits, sensors, actuators, and
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transmitters. But Opto 22 modules provide more than just
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a connection: they provide optical and transformer isolation to protect your control electronics
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and reduce noise.
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Because Opto 22 has nearly 100 different SNAP I/O modules, we can handle just about any
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type of signal in your application. You choose the ones you need based on the
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sensors and devices you’re controlling or monitoring. And because many are software
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configurable, a small number of modules can handle a wide range of tasks.
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SNAP modules are available in a variety of configurations, ranging from 1 to 32 channels
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per module. That way you have the right amount and right type of I/O for your application,
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without having to buy more than you need.
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Finally, we created the SNAP TEX line to simplify wiring and installation of your SNAP PAC System.
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SNAP TEX cables snap neatly into the tops of SNAP I/O modules and terminate
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with pre-stripped, color-coded flying leads for connection to field devices, terminal
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strips, or breakout boards.
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Our SNAP TEX breakout boards come in 4, 16, or 32 channel configurations, and offer features
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like power busing, fusing with fuse-blown indicators, or mechanical relays.
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Opto 22 knows that reliability is important to you. That’s why all of our products
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are built in our manufacturing plant here in Temecula, California, and we test each
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module at least twice before it is put on the shelf. Then we back that up with a lifetime
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guarantee on all optically-isolated models.
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So there you have it — the four parts of an Opto 22 SNAP PAC System: software, controllers,
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brains, and I/O. Together these four simple components form
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a system capable of handling virtually any automation task, from basic equipment monitoring
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to complete factory automation.
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And don’t forget: Opto 22 is always here to help you. We offer free hands-on training,
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free Product Support from experienced engineers,
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and free documentation on all the SNAP PAC System components. If you have any questions
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on how to get started with SNAP PACs, please call or email our friendly pre-sales engineering
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team. They’ll be happy to help you build a system for your needs.
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Thanks for watching our SNAP PAC Systems video. See you next time!
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