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Good day. In this video we're going to go over the steps required to communicate
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with a Modbus TCP device using groov view. I'm going to be using this groov
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EPIC Learning Center. Now it's perfect for learning more about groov EPIC or
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doing a proof of concept project. I'm also going to be using this Satec P-130
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power meter as my Modbus tcp device. It's measuring the voltage and frequency of
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the mains power here in the studio. And, our goal is to display that data in
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groov view. To get started you'll need the IP address of your Modbus device and
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the host name of your EPIC processor. you'll also need the Modbus device
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address registers. And, this is usually found in the manual or a supplementary
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manual for the device. You'll also need both devices on the same network as your
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laptop. So go ahead open a browser on your computer and go to HTTP colon slash
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slash the host name of your epic processor. Log in and from the home page.
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Select groov view. Start by going to the build mode from
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the menu in the top right.
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First we need to add a page to our project.
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We can start by giving it a name. Let's add a title bar,
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giving it a name. And, flicking over to the handheld view
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we can see that this page is being built at the same time as a desktop and tablet
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view. Now let's go ahead and add the Modbus TCP device. Click on devices and
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tags and then add new device. Select Modbus device from the drop down list,
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giving it a name. Here we can enter the IP address and the port number. These are
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set in your Modbus device. We can leave all the other settings as default
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except for base one addressing. In the case of this Satec power meter the
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address of the register is the correct byte order so we can clear this
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checkmark. You'll need to check your manual for your device or simply try it
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each way and check your results. Once that's done we can now configure the
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tags on the device. Let's start with voltage. Look at the device manual to
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find the register address and any scaling that may be needed to be done.
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Now that we have that information we can start by giving it a name. It's a 16-bit
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unsigned integer. It's address is from a holding address
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256. It's read-only. And if we just stopped here and ran the project we
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would just see the raw 16-bit number. It would not be very helpful so we need to
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rescale it into engineering units. In this case volts ac.
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From the manual we know that our upper value in raw counts is 9999, and a lower
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value of zero raw counts. The result is a floating-point number that scales to 144
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upper volts and zero lower volts. Let's now add the frequency. The process
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is the same, you get the register address the scaling values and the conversion
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formula from the device manual and then you enter it into the tag. Give it a name.
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It's a 16-bit unsigned integer. Its addresses 279. It's a read-only value and
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the scaling is much the same as voltage. It can be a raw count of 9999 maximum
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to zero counts minimum. The scaled result is a floating-point number with a
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maximum of 65 Hertz and a minimum of 45 Hertz. Now our data points are set up and
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we can add them to any gadgets that we want. I'm going to make the frequency a
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dial gauge.
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make the range pretty narrow.
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And, add a colored range indicator around the 60 hertz point.
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For the voltage I'm going to use a range indicator. Click, drag, drop it onto the
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workspace.
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Now set up the range 115 to 120 volts. Set the units and let's put a green
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range indicator on this one as well. Let's save our changes and see the
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screen in View mode now. And there we go. We can see the data presented clearly
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and in engineering units.For more information about groov you can check out
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training. opto22.com Till next time cheers mate.