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Good Day. In this video we're going to take a look at using a serial to USB
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converter on the groov EPIC. By using this RS-232 to USB converter we're able
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to read in serial data by the groov EPIC USB port. Now to show how this works
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I'm going to be using this groov EPIC Learning Center. It's great for learning
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more about groov EPIC or for doing proof-of-concept projects. You can get
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yours by visiting opto22.com. I'm also going to be using this GPS device that
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outputs an RS-232 data stream. To get your device details and the check that it's
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ready to go you first visit the groov Manage home screen and then click on
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system and then serial devices. We currently show none,
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but if we plug in the converter we will see one serial device is added to the
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list. Now what sort of converter can you use? Well it's important that it's an
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authentic FTDI device. And you can use an RS-232 RS-422 or an RS-485 converter. And,
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if you need more than just two you can use a powered USB hub to expand the
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number of converters that you can connect. Now once you plug the converter
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in make a note of the device name and port number as we'll need them in a
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moment. What you want to do with your data will determine your next move. For
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example you could send the serial data to a cloud service or to an MQTT broker,
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via Node-RED, or you could use the serial data in a control program like PAC
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Control. Note that with both Node-RED and PAC control if you change the port the
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adapter is plugged into you will need to change their configuration. So be sure
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and plug the converter back into the same USB port if you disconnect it for
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any reason. With that said let's now take a look at how we set up each option. fFor
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Node-RED we first create a new flow workspace.
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Then we simply drag in a serial node into the workspace and to see it's output
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will use a debug node. Double-click on the serial node to configure it.
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Type in the device name that you got a moment ago from groov Manage and enter
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the baud rate, parity, and stop bits. For my GPS device it's going to be 9600, 8 none,
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and one. Connect the two nodes with a wire. Hit
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deploy and you're done. You can now see your serial data flowing in the debug
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tab. Where you go from here will be determined by your application. Now for
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PAC Control we first have to configure our comm handle so here we are in
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Configure mode and from the strategy tree right click on communication handle
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and select add. Now you can name the comm handle anything you like. I'm simply
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going to name it CH for comm handle and then the name of the device: GPS. Next is
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the string that will set up the communication properties for the device
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you first need the address of the device so it's ser; and then the port
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number you noted a moment ago from groov Manage. After the port number set
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the baud rate and so on. So here in my case the full initialization string is
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ser; zero, 9600, none, 8, 1 For all
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the parameters that the comm handle can support check out the PAC Control users
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guide now here we are looking at data coming
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from the GPS module. When it comes to programming the flowchart there are lots
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of options and different ways to write the code depending on your application.
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For more information on how to do this check out training.opto22.com till next
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time cheers mate