00:01
[Music]
00:06
Whether you like to catch fish, or just eat it, you might be surprised to find out where
00:10
a lot of that fish comes from. Many fish populations have struggled, because of damage to their
00:15
habitats or over-harvesting. Fortunately, for anglers and fish lovers, fish hatcheries
00:21
can supplement natural populations for both commercial and recreational fishing. Because
00:25
it's so important to keep the fish in hatcheries healthy, a great deal of automation is required.
00:31
Hi, Alexi here from Opto 22. Today, we're here at Wolf Lake state fish hatchery, one
00:37
of six fish hatcheries operated by Michigan's Department of Natural Resources. They've invited
00:42
us here today to show us how they hatch and raise fish, as well as how they monitor and
00:47
control these systems. Let's go take a look.
00:50
[Music]
01:03
>>Alexi: Hi. Today I'm here with Chris Klage from Michigan's Department of Natural Resources.
01:08
Chris, can you tell us a little bit about yourself? >>Chris: What I do is, I take care of the six
01:13
hatcheries within Michigan, all the process control and alarm monitoring systems within
01:18
the hatcheries. We have four in the lower peninsula and two in the upper peninsula as
01:23
far as the hatcheries, and we raise a variety of fish from brown trout to sturgeon to rainbow
01:28
trout, for all public waters within Michigan. >>Alexi: For the uninitiated like myself,
01:33
can you tell us a little bit about what's involved with the fish hatching process?
01:36
>>Chris: From the beginning of the cycle of fish hatching, we actually go out into the
01:43
public waters. They call it stripping the fish eggs from the female, fertilizing the
01:48
eggs from the male, and bringing them back to the hatchery. That's where our process
01:53
starts. We actually go into the incubation, we actually raise these fish to they call
01:58
it a swim-up stage, or a fry. From that stage the fish come from incubation into our indoor
02:04
tanks. Depending on the species, but they stay within the indoor tanks for approximately
02:09
four to six months. And then from there, they continue the rest of their life in the hatchery
02:14
in the outdoor raceways, which is almost a year. These fish are very delicate. Within a short
02:20
period of time these fish can actually die just from a lack of water, lack of oxygen.
02:27
Well, my responsibility is to maintain the alarm system within these hatcheries that
02:32
monitor these processes. From the egg stage to the actual, we call them a yearling stage,
02:37
they are treated many different times. They have certain medicated feeds, vaccines that
02:43
we do. We try to raise a very healthy product. So when we put a fish out back in the public
02:49
waters, that fish has a good chance of survival. >>Alexi: And where do the fish go when you release them?
02:55
>>Chris: Actually, within the state of Michigan,
02:57
every waterway you can imagine. Every little lake, stream, some inland, some tributaries
03:03
to all the Great Lakes, even some of our fish actually make it to other states.
03:06
>>Alexi: Can you give us an idea of how many fish you produce?
03:09
>>Chris: Depending on the facility, depending on the size of the facility, anywhere between
03:15
two and a half to six million fish. And what we're trying to do is promote our product.
03:21
Our product is fish. We try to sell licenses. And so what we do is we try to offer visitor
03:27
centers to the public to make them aware of what we do. The most popular attraction at
03:32
the visitor's center is the viewing pond, where people can see six-foot sturgeon and
03:38
then feed the other fish in the pond, from trout, salmon, there's even some muskies and northern pike.
03:45
>>Alexi: Because your primary goal is to keep these fish healthy, obviously monitoring and alarming is
03:50
crucial to your function. Can you tell us a little bit about the monitoring systems you have in place?
03:54
>>Chris: To keep it simple, I came up with this little thing many years ago and I call
03:58
it POW, which is power, oxygen, and water. From there, within the six hatcheries, they
04:04
branch off into about 900 different monitoring points from that power, oxygen, and water.
04:11
Power meaning the presence of, or the absence of, at various pumps, motors, lift stations,
04:17
the concentration of oxygen, and water. One of our biggest concerns in any hatchery environment
04:23
is thunderstorms. We are always within wet locations, very low-lying areas with a lot
04:30
of water. And of course lightning likes water and low-lying areas. When I started doing
04:35
a little research on Opto 22, I heard Opto 22 had modules--or actually one of their claims to
04:43
fame was an optically-isolated relay. Well with an optically-isolated, meaning, there's
04:49
no direct connection for electricity to follow. And that was a large selling point for me.
04:55
Opto 22 has proven to be very reliable equipment. Again this is a nine-year-old system now.
05:03
A lot of the equipment that's out there is the original equipment that was put in
05:07
in 1999 and it's still operating wonderfully. >>Alexi: What happens when an alarm occurs?
05:12
>>Chris: A lot of our equipment is automated. So there will be automatic generators that
05:17
will start, the pumps will automatically start, various other processes will automatically
05:25
come back on. This is actually our HMI that ties into the system. We have two of our main
05:31
racks for the hatchery building and this is actually where all of the alarms are reported
05:35
to and logged to. So if your water does go low, it actually gives you an alarm. If the
05:41
temperature, if it goes too high, it actually initiates a timer. And when that timer times
05:46
out, if it doesn't hit its setpoint within a certain time, that's when it shuts down
05:51
and it just goes cold. You can't freeze a fish, but you can boil them real easy.
05:57
The temperature-controlled water comes in here, through the top tray, from that top tray through
06:03
each series of trays. These are filled with your small eggs of your fish, different species.
06:11
These are called heath trays. From the heath trays they actually become fry, which is a
06:16
small fish, and from the tray they'll go from here out to the tanks in their tank room.
06:21
>>Alexi: Great. Well, thanks Chris for showing us your application. I sure learned a lot.
06:25
And thank you for watching this video. For more information visit Opto22.com. See you next time!
06:31
[Music]